Association of NADPH oxidase polymorphisms with anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in the RICOVER-60 trial of patients with aggressive CD20(+) B-cell lymphoma.

Abstract:

AIM: To identify gene variants responsible for anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity. PATIENTS & METHODS: Polymorphisms of the NADPH oxidase subunits and of the anthracycline transporters ABCC1, ABCC2 and SLC28A3 were genotyped in elderly patients (61-80 years) treated for aggressive CD20(+) B-cell lymphomas with CHOP-14 with or without rituximab and followed up for 3 years. RESULTS: The accumulation of RAC2 subunit genotypes TA/AA among cases was statistically significant upon adjustment for gender, age and doxorubicin dose in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR: 2.3, p = 0.028; univariate: OR: 1.8, p = 0.077). RAC2 and CYBA genotypes were significantly associated with anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in a meta-analysis of this and a similar previous study. CONCLUSION: Our results support the theory that NADPH oxidase is involved in anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity. Original submitted 9 July 2014; Revision submitted 19 December 2014.

LHA ID: 7W2GPGUW7R-1

PubMed ID: 25823784

Projects: GLA - German Lymphoma Alliance

Publication type: Not specified

Journal: Pharmacogenomics

Human Diseases: B-cell lymphoma

Citation: Pharmacogenomics. 2015;16(4):361-72. doi: 10.2217/pgs.14.179.

Date Published: 1st Apr 2015

Registered Mode: by PubMed ID

Authors: A. Reichwagen, M. Ziepert, M. Kreuz, U. Godtel-Armbrust, T. Rixecker, V. Poeschel, M. Reza Toliat, P. Nurnberg, M. Tzvetkov, S. Deng, L. Trumper, G. Hasenfuss, M. Pfreundschuh, L. Wojnowski

Help
help Submitter
Activity

Views: 1079

Created: 17th Apr 2019 at 13:49

Last updated: 16th May 2019 at 15:02

help Attributions

None

Related items

Powered by
(v.1.12.0-master)
Copyright © 2008 - 2021 The University of Manchester and HITS gGmbH
Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Leipzig

By continuing to use this site you agree to the use of cookies