Nicotinamide: a vitamin able to shift macrophage differentiation toward macrophages with restricted inflammatory features.

Abstract:

The differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages is influenced by environmental signals. Here we asked in how far nicotinamide (NAM), a vitamin B3 derivative known to play a major role in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-mediated signaling events, is able to modulate monocyte differentiation into macrophages developed in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-MO) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-MO). We found that GM-MO undergo biochemical, morphological and functional modifications in response to NAM, whereas M-MO were hardly affected. GM-MO exposed to NAM acquired an M-MO-like structure while the LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and COX-derived eicosanoids were down-regulated. In contrast, NAM had no effect on the production of IL-10 or the cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids. Administration of NAM enhanced intracellular NAD concentrations; however, it did not prevent the LPS-mediated drain on NAD pools. In search of intracellular molecular targets of NAM known to be involved in LPS-induced cytokine and eicosanoid synthesis, we found NF-kappaB activity to be diminished. In conclusion, our data show that vitamin B3, when present during the differentiation of monocytes into GM-MO, interferes with biochemical pathways resulting in strongly reduced pro-inflammatory features.

LHA-ID: 7Q6RC7CUDJ-7

PubMed ID: 26385774

Projects: LIFE- Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases

Journal: Innate Immun

Human Diseases: No Human Disease specified

Citation: Innate Immun. 2015 Nov;21(8):813-26. doi: 10.1177/1753425915602545. Epub 2015 Sep 18.

Date Published: 20th Sep 2015

Authors: R. Weiss, E. Schilling, A. Grahnert, V. Kolling, J. Dorow, U. Ceglarek, U. Sack, S. Hauschildt

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Created: 9th May 2019 at 14:44

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