Publications

5 Publications visible to you, out of a total of 5

Abstract (Expand)

Background: Hippocampal volume, assessed via high-resolution MRI, is associated with memory and visuospatial performance in humans (Squire, 2004) and specifically prone to develop atrophy with age (Apostolova,2015). This process has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (Apostolova,2015) and a decline of cognitive functions (Bruno,2016). However, due to differences in study-design and characteristics certain heterogeneity in results remains, in particular considering subfieldspecific effects (deFlores,2015). Therefore, we aim to determine the association of volumes of the whole hippocampus and its subfields on cognition in a large population-based cohort. Methods: Subjects: 1956 healthy participants from the Leipzig Research-Center-for-Civilization-Disease, aged 19-82years with MRI and neuropsychological tests (mean-age=57.61,±15.08SD). Exclusion: stroke, major-brain-pathologies, central-nervous-medication. Independent Variables: Volume of hippocampus and its subfields (CornuAmmonis1, 2-3, 4-DentateGyrus,(Pre-)subiculum). Dependent Variables: Verbal word-list learning, verbal-fluency, TrailMakingTask-(TMT)-A&B. Covariates: sex, age, years-of-education, total grey-mattervolume Image Analysis on high-resolution T1-images assessed at 3T. Hippocampal volumes were estimated using automatic segmentation analysis implemented in FreeSurfer (www.freesurfer.net). Statistical Analysis: Independent and dependent variables were first entered into Pearson Correlations. Variables with a correlation coefficient of r>0.1 were entered into multiple linear-regressions and adjusted for potential confounding(forward inclusion-model). Results: According to bivariate correlations, better performance in verbal-learning, verbal-fluency and TMT-A&B correlated moderately with larger whole-hippocampal volume and the volumes of all subfields(all |r|>0.102, all p0.046, all p0.5). Conclusions: Using a large cross-sectional cohort of healthy adults we found that volumes of the whole-hippocampus and subfields covering the CA4/dentate-gyrus region were weakly, yet specifically associated with verbal-learning and spatial processing-speed. Our preliminary results are in line with previous studies presuming a differential involvement of the hippocampus in tasks of verbal-learning and spatial processing (Oosterman,2010). Upcoming analyses implementing parcellation along the anteriorposterior- axis and random-effect-models might help to further disentangle these effects.

Authors: S. Huhn, R. Zhang, Frauke Beyer, L. Lampe, T. Luck, S. G. Riedel-Heller, M. L. Schroeter, Markus Löffler, M. Stumvoll, A. Villringer, A. V. Witte

Date Published: 1st Jul 2017

Publication Type: Not specified

Human Diseases: cognitive disorder, dementia

Abstract (Expand)

Background: Previous studies have shown that individuals with poor social relationships have an increased risk for dementia. Dementia risk, however, can also be positively influenced by lifestyle factors such as high mental demands at work (in particular as the work environment affects a very long lifetime period). Thus, our objective was to investigate whether the cognitive functioning of socially isolated individuals may profit from high mental work demands. Methods: Analyses were based on n=10,000 participants (aged 40-80 years) of the population-based German LIFE-Adult-Study. All participants underwent medical examinations and filled out standardized questionnaires. Cognitive functioning was assessed via the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT) and the Trail-Making Test (TMT). Social relationships were assessed via the Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS-6). Results: The difference in cognitive func- tioning between high and low mental work demand conditions was larger in socially isolated individuals (VFT: 2.7 words, TMT-B: 26 seconds) compared to socially well integrated individuals (VFT: 2.1 words, TMT-B: 9 seconds). Multivariate regression analyses – adjusted for age, gender, and education – indicated that both mental work demands as well as social relationships are significantly asso- ciated with the level of cognitive functioning

Authors: F. S. Then, M. L. Schroeter, A. V. Witte, Christoph Engel, Markus Löffler, J. Thiery, A. Villringer, T. Luck, S. G. Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 1st Sep 2016

Publication Type: Not specified

Human Diseases: cognitive disorder

Abstract (Expand)

The revised NIA-AA diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD make use of amyloid pathology and neurodegeneration biomarkers which increase the diagnostic confidence in the majority of patients. However, in daily praxis, cases with conflicting biomarker constellations occur. A MCI subject underwent neuropsychological testing supplemented by FDG and amyloid PET/MRI as well as CSF sampling. In this subject, the biomarkers of Abeta deposition were negative. [18F]FDG PET, however, showed an AD-typical hypometabolism. Further studies are required to determine frequency and relevance of cases with neurodegeneration-first biomarker constellations to improve our understanding on pathogenesis and diagnosis of AD.

Authors: S. Tiepolt, M. Patt, K. T. Hoffmann, M. L. Schroeter, O. Sabri, H. Barthel

Date Published: 25th Sep 2015

Publication Type: Not specified

Human Diseases: cognitive disorder, Alzheimer's disease

Abstract (Expand)

Research increasingly suggests that subjective cognitive decline (SCD) in older adults, in the absence of objective cognitive dysfunction or depression, may be a harbinger of non-normative cognitive decline and eventual progression to dementia. Little is known, however, about the key features of self-report measures currently used to assess SCD. The Subjective Cognitive Decline Initiative (SCD-I) Working Group is an international consortium established to develop a conceptual framework and research criteria for SCD (Jessen et al., 2014, Alzheimers Dement 10, 844-852). In the current study we systematically compared cognitive self-report items used by 19 SCD-I Working Group studies, representing 8 countries and 5 languages. We identified 34 self-report measures comprising 640 cognitive self-report items. There was little overlap among measures- approximately 75% of measures were used by only one study. Wide variation existed in response options and item content. Items pertaining to the memory domain predominated, accounting for about 60% of items surveyed, followed by executive function and attention, with 16% and 11% of the items, respectively. Items relating to memory for the names of people and the placement of common objects were represented on the greatest percentage of measures (56% each). Working group members reported that instrument selection decisions were often based on practical considerations beyond the study of SCD specifically, such as availability and brevity of measures. Results document the heterogeneity of approaches across studies to the emerging construct of SCD. We offer preliminary recommendations for instrument selection and future research directions including identifying items and measure formats associated with important clinical outcomes.

Authors: L. A. Rabin, C. M. Smart, P. K. Crane, R. E. Amariglio, L. M. Berman, M. Boada, R. F. Buckley, G. Chetelat, B. Dubois, K. A. Ellis, K. A. Gifford, A. L. Jefferson, F. Jessen, M. J. Katz, R. B. Lipton, T. Luck, P. Maruff, M. M. Mielke, J. L. Molinuevo, F. Naeem, A. Perrotin, R. C. Petersen, L. Rami, B. Reisberg, D. M. Rentz, S. G. Riedel-Heller, S. L. Risacher, O. Rodriguez, P. S. Sachdev, A. J. Saykin, M. J. Slavin, B. E. Snitz, R. A. Sperling, C. Tandetnik, W. M. van der Flier, M. Wagner, S. Wolfsgruber, S. A. Sikkes

Date Published: 24th Sep 2015

Publication Type: Not specified

Human Diseases: cognitive disorder, dementia

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVE: Dementia is known to increase mortality, but the relative loss of life years and contributing factors are not well established. Thus, we aimed to investigate mortality in incident dementia from disease onset. METHOD: Data were derived from the prospective longitudinal German AgeCoDe study. We used proportional hazards models to assess the impact of sociodemographic and health characteristics on mortality after dementia onset, Kaplan-Meier method for median survival times. RESULTS: Of 3214 subjects at risk, 523 (16.3%) developed incident dementia during a 9-year follow-up period. Median survival time after onset was 3.2 years (95% CI = 2.8-3.7) at a mean age of 85.0 (SD = 4.0) years (>/=2.6 life years lost compared with the general German population). Survival was shorter in older age, males other dementias than Alzheimer's, and in the absence of subjective memory complaints (SMC). CONCLUSION: Our findings emphasize that dementia substantially shortens life expectancy. Future studies should further investigate the potential impact of SMC on mortality in dementia.

Authors: S. Roehr, T. Luck, H. Bickel, C. Brettschneider, A. Ernst, A. Fuchs, K. Heser, H. H. Konig, F. Jessen, C. Lange, E. Mosch, M. Pentzek, S. Steinmann, S. Weyerer, J. Werle, B. Wiese, M. Scherer, W. Maier, S. G. Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 9th Jun 2015

Publication Type: Not specified

Human Diseases: cognitive disorder, dementia

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