Publications

Abstract (Expand)

Background: Hippocampal volume, assessed via high-resolution MRI, is associated with memory and visuospatial performance in humans (Squire, 2004) and specifically prone to develop atrophy with age (Apostolova,2015). This process has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (Apostolova,2015) and a decline of cognitive functions (Bruno,2016). However, due to differences in study-design and characteristics certain heterogeneity in results remains, in particular considering subfieldspecific effects (deFlores,2015). Therefore, we aim to determine the association of volumes of the whole hippocampus and its subfields on cognition in a large population-based cohort. Methods: Subjects: 1956 healthy participants from the Leipzig Research-Center-for-Civilization-Disease, aged 19-82years with MRI and neuropsychological tests (mean-age=57.61,±15.08SD). Exclusion: stroke, major-brain-pathologies, central-nervous-medication. Independent Variables: Volume of hippocampus and its subfields (CornuAmmonis1, 2-3, 4-DentateGyrus,(Pre-)subiculum). Dependent Variables: Verbal word-list learning, verbal-fluency, TrailMakingTask-(TMT)-A&B. Covariates: sex, age, years-of-education, total grey-mattervolume Image Analysis on high-resolution T1-images assessed at 3T. Hippocampal volumes were estimated using automatic segmentation analysis implemented in FreeSurfer (www.freesurfer.net). Statistical Analysis: Independent and dependent variables were first entered into Pearson Correlations. Variables with a correlation coefficient of r>0.1 were entered into multiple linear-regressions and adjusted for potential confounding(forward inclusion-model). Results: According to bivariate correlations, better performance in verbal-learning, verbal-fluency and TMT-A&B correlated moderately with larger whole-hippocampal volume and the volumes of all subfields(all |r|>0.102, all p0.046, all p0.5). Conclusions: Using a large cross-sectional cohort of healthy adults we found that volumes of the whole-hippocampus and subfields covering the CA4/dentate-gyrus region were weakly, yet specifically associated with verbal-learning and spatial processing-speed. Our preliminary results are in line with previous studies presuming a differential involvement of the hippocampus in tasks of verbal-learning and spatial processing (Oosterman,2010). Upcoming analyses implementing parcellation along the anteriorposterior- axis and random-effect-models might help to further disentangle these effects.

Authors: Sebastian Huhn, Rui Zhang, Frauke Beyer, L. Lampe, Tobias Luck, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller, M. L. Schroeter, Markus Löffler, M. Stumvoll, A. Villringer, A. V. Witte

Date Published: 1st Jul 2017

Journal: Elsevier BV

Human Diseases: cognitive disorder, dementia

Abstract (Expand)

INTRODUCTION: A global dementia epidemic is projected for the year 2050 with an ever-rising number of individuals living with the syndrome worldwide. However, increasingly, studies are emerging from high-income countries (HIC) that show a positive trend towards a possible decrease in dementia occurrence. Therefore, we aim to systematically summarise evidence regarding secular trends in the incidence of dementia in HIC. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will conduct a systematic review of the literature on secular trends in dementia incidence in HIC according to the recommendations of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) and the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) statements. To do so, we will search the databases MEDLINE (PubMed interface), EMBASE (Ovid interface) and Web of Science (Web of Science interface), as well as the grey literature on unpublished studies. To be eligible, studies must have been published in English or German since 1990 and provide sufficient information on prespecified eligibility criteria regarding outcome measurement and methodological approach. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment will be performed independently by 2 reviewers. Disagreement will be resolved by discussion and/or the involvement of a third researcher. Data abstraction will include study and participant characteristics, outcomes and methodological aspects. Results will be described and discussed regarding methodology. Depending on the number of studies found and the heterogeneity between the studies, we plan to combine outcome data through meta-analysis in order to get pooled incidence measures. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No primary data will be collected; thus, ethical approval is not required. The results will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016043232.

Authors: Susanne Roehr, A. Pabst, Tobias Luck, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 7th Apr 2017

Journal: BMJ Open

Human Diseases: dementia, Alzheimer's disease

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND: Subjective cognitive decline (SCD), i.e., the self-perceived feeling of worsening cognitive function, may be the first notable syndrome of preclinical Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. However, not all individuals with SCD progress. Stability of SCD, i.e., repeated reports of SCD, could contribute to identify individuals at risk, as stable SCD may more likely reflect the continuous neurodegenerative process of Alzheimer's and other dementias. METHODS: Cox regression analyses were used to assess the association between stability of SCD and progression to MCI and dementia in data derived from the population-based Leipzig Longitudinal Study of the Aged (LEILA75+). RESULTS: Of 453 cognitively unimpaired individuals with a mean age of 80.5 years (SD = 4.2), 139 (30.7 %) reported SCD at baseline. Over the study period (M = 4.8 years, SD = 2.2), 84 (18.5 %) individuals had stable SCD, 195 (43.1 %) unstable SCD and 174 (38.4 %) never reported SCD. Stable SCD was associated with increased risk of progression to MCI and dementia (unadjusted HR = 1.8, 95 % CI = 1.2-2.6; p < .01), whereas unstable SCD yielded a decreased progression risk (unadjusted HR = 0.5, 95 % CI = 0.4-0.7; p < .001) compared to no SCD. When adjusted for baseline cognitive functioning, progression risk in individuals with stable SCD was significantly increased in comparison to individuals with unstable SCD, but not compared to individuals without SCD. CONCLUSIONS: Our results, though preliminary, suggest that stable SCD, i.e., repeated reports of SCD, may yield an increased risk of progression to MCI and dementia compared to unstable SCD. Baseline cognitive scores, though within a normal range, seem to be a driver of progression in stable SCD. Future research is warranted to investigate whether stability could hold as a SCD research feature.

Authors: Susanne Roehr, A. Villringer, M. C. Angermeyer, Tobias Luck, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 4th Nov 2016

Journal: BMC Geriatr

Human Diseases: dementia, Alzheimer's disease

Abstract (Expand)

INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that an overall high level of mental work demands decreased dementia risk. In our study, we investigated whether this effect is driven by specific mental work demands and whether it is exposure dependent. METHODS: Patients aged 75+ years were recruited from general practitioners and participated in up to seven assessment waves (every 1.5 years) of the longitudinal AgeCoDe study. Analyses of the impact of specific mental work demands on dementia risk were carried out via multivariate regression modeling (n = 2315). RESULTS: We observed a significantly lower dementia risk in individuals with a higher level of "information processing" (HR, 0.888), "pattern detection" (HR, 0.878), "mathematics" (HR, 0.878), and "creativity" (HR, 0.878). Yet, exposure-dependent effects were only significant for "information processing" and "pattern detection." DISCUSSION: Our longitudinal observations suggest that dementia risk may be reduced by some but not all types of mental work demands.

Authors: F. S. Then, Tobias Luck, K. Heser, A. Ernst, T. Posselt, B. Wiese, S. Mamone, C. Brettschneider, H. H. Konig, S. Weyerer, J. Werle, E. Mosch, H. Bickel, A. Fuchs, M. Pentzek, W. Maier, M. Scherer, M. Wagner, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 30th Oct 2016

Journal: Alzheimers Dement

Human Diseases: dementia

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether longitudinal stability versus instability in subjective cognitive decline (SCD) is a modifying factor of the association between SCD and risk of incident Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. OBJECTIVE: We tested the modifying role of temporal stability of the SCD report on AD dementia risk in cognitively normal elderly individuals. METHODS: We analyzed data of 1,990 cognitively normal participants from the longitudinal AgeCoDe Study. We assessed SCD with/without associated worries both at baseline and first follow-up 18 months later. Participants were then classified either as (a) Controls (CO, with no SCD at both baseline and follow-up 1, n = 613), (b) inconsistent SCD (with SCD reported only at baseline or at follow-up 1, n = 637), (c) consistent SCD but without/or with inconsistent worries (n = 610) or (d) consistent SCD with worries (n = 130). We estimated incident AD dementia risk over up to 6 years for each group with Cox-Proportional Hazard Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, education, ApoE4 status, and depression. RESULTS: Compared to CO, inconsistent SCD was not associated with increased risk of incident AD dementia. In contrast, risk was doubled in the group of consistent SCD without/ with inconsistent worries, and almost 4-fold in the group of consistent SCD with worries. These results could be replicated when using follow-up 1 to follow-up 2 response patterns for group definition. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that longitudinal stability versus instability is an important modifying factor of the association between SCD and AD dementia risk. Worrisome SCD that is also consistently reported over time is associated with greatly increased risk of AD dementia.

Authors: S. Wolfsgruber, L. Kleineidam, M. Wagner, E. Mosch, H. Bickel, D. Lupsilonhmann, A. Ernst, B. Wiese, S. Steinmann, H. H. Konig, C. Brettschneider, Tobias Luck, J. Stein, S. Weyerer, J. Werle, M. Pentzek, A. Fuchs, W. Maier, M. Scherer, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller, F. Jessen

Date Published: 4th Oct 2016

Journal: J Alzheimers Dis

Human Diseases: dementia, Alzheimer's disease

Abstract

Not specified

Authors: S. Bisenius, J. Neumann, M. L. Schroeter

Date Published: 20th Jul 2016

Journal: Eur J Neurol

Human Diseases: dementia, aphasia

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVES: even though a great number of research studies have shown that high education has protective effects against dementia, some studies did not observe such a significant effect. In that respect, the aim of our study was to investigate and compare various operationalisation approaches of education and how they impact dementia risk within one sample. METHODS: data were derived from the Leipzig longitudinal study of the aged (LEILA75+). Individuals aged 75 and older underwent six cognitive assessments at an interval of 1.5 years and a final follow-up 15 years after the baseline assessment. We operationalised education according to different approaches used in previous studies and analysed the impact on dementia incidence via multivariate cox regression modelling. RESULTS: the results showed that whether education is identified as significant protector against dementia strongly depends on the operationalisation of education. Whereas the pure number of years of education showed statistically significant protective effects on dementia risk, other more complex categorical classification approaches did not. Moreover, completing >10 years of education or a tertiary level seems to be an important threshold to significantly reduce dementia risk. CONCLUSION: findings suggest a protective effect of more years of education on a lower dementia risk with a particular critical threshold of completing >10 years of education. Further, the findings highlight that, when examining risks and protective factors of dementia, a careful consideration of the underlying definitions and operationalisation approaches is required.

Authors: F. S. Then, Tobias Luck, M. C. Angermeyer, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 9th Apr 2016

Journal: Age Ageing

Human Diseases: dementia

Abstract (Expand)

Objectives: The concept of compression of morbidity suggests that compressing cognitive morbidity into a shorter lifetime period would result in a better cumulative lifetime cognitive functioning. Some lifestyle factors, like higher education, that are known to protect cognitive functioning in old age and lower dementia risk, could compress cognitive morbidity. Therefore the aim of our study was to investigate whether higher education leads to a better cumulative lifetime cognitive functioning and, hence, the compression of cognitive morbidity. Methods: Data were derived from the population-based Leipzig longitudinal study of the aged (LEILA75+). From 1998-2005, individuals aged 75 years and older underwent up to seven assessments at a 1.5-year interval and a long-term follow-up assessment after 15 years (2013). Analyses on the impact of higher education on compression of cognitive morbidity were carried out via multilevel logistic mixed-models and tobit analyses using the participants’ age as time scale (n=742). Results: The results revealed that more years of education were significantly associated with a better cognitive functioning but not with the age at dementia onset or the age at death. Computation of cumulative lifetime cognitive functioning was weighted for survival probability and indicated a gain of 21 MMSE points during the lifetime period 75 through 100 years of age by having more than 12 years of education compared to having less than 9 years of education. Conclusion: Overall, the findings suggest a compression of cognitive morbidity by higher education prior to dementia onset. More years of education could therefore contribute to a better cognitive functioning even under consideration of survival probability. Hence, efforts to ensure access to higher education for as many people in a population as possible might compress disease burden due to cognitive morbidity.

Authors: F. S. Then, Tobias Luck, H. Matschinger, M. C. Angermeyer, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 1st Mar 2016

Journal: Elsevier BV

Human Diseases: dementia

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVE: Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) might represent the first symptomatic representation of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is associated with increased mortality. Only few studies, however, have analyzed the association of SCD and mortality, and if so, based on prevalent cases. Thus, we investigated incident SCD in memory and mortality. METHODS: Data were derived from the German AgeCoDe study, a prospective longitudinal study on the epidemiology of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in primary care patients over 75 years covering an observation period of 7.5 years. We used univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses to examine the relationship of SCD and mortality. Further, we estimated survival times by the Kaplan Meier method and case-fatality rates with regard to SCD. RESULTS: Among 971 individuals without objective cognitive impairment, 233 (24.0%) incidentally expressed SCD at follow-up I. Incident SCD was not significantly associated with increased mortality in the univariate (HR = 1.0, 95% confidence interval = 0.8-1.3, p = .90) as well as in the multivariate analysis (HR = 0.9, 95% confidence interval = 0.7-1.2, p = .40). The same applied for SCD in relation to concerns. Mean survival time with SCD was 8.0 years (SD = 0.1) after onset. CONCLUSION: Incident SCD in memory in individuals with unimpaired cognitive performance does not predict mortality. The main reason might be that SCD does not ultimately lead into future cognitive decline in any case. However, as prevalence studies suggest, subjectively perceived decline in non-memory cognitive domains might be associated with increased mortality. Future studies may address mortality in such other cognitive domains of SCD in incident cases.

Authors: Susanne Roehr, Tobias Luck, K. Heser, A. Fuchs, A. Ernst, B. Wiese, J. Werle, H. Bickel, C. Brettschneider, A. Koppara, M. Pentzek, C. Lange, J. Prokein, S. Weyerer, E. Mosch, H. H. Konig, W. Maier, M. Scherer, F. Jessen, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 15th Jan 2016

Journal: PLoS One

Human Diseases: dementia

Abstract (Expand)

Research increasingly suggests that subjective cognitive decline (SCD) in older adults, in the absence of objective cognitive dysfunction or depression, may be a harbinger of non-normative cognitive decline and eventual progression to dementia. Little is known, however, about the key features of self-report measures currently used to assess SCD. The Subjective Cognitive Decline Initiative (SCD-I) Working Group is an international consortium established to develop a conceptual framework and research criteria for SCD (Jessen et al., 2014, Alzheimers Dement 10, 844-852). In the current study we systematically compared cognitive self-report items used by 19 SCD-I Working Group studies, representing 8 countries and 5 languages. We identified 34 self-report measures comprising 640 cognitive self-report items. There was little overlap among measures- approximately 75% of measures were used by only one study. Wide variation existed in response options and item content. Items pertaining to the memory domain predominated, accounting for about 60% of items surveyed, followed by executive function and attention, with 16% and 11% of the items, respectively. Items relating to memory for the names of people and the placement of common objects were represented on the greatest percentage of measures (56% each). Working group members reported that instrument selection decisions were often based on practical considerations beyond the study of SCD specifically, such as availability and brevity of measures. Results document the heterogeneity of approaches across studies to the emerging construct of SCD. We offer preliminary recommendations for instrument selection and future research directions including identifying items and measure formats associated with important clinical outcomes.

Authors: L. A. Rabin, C. M. Smart, P. K. Crane, R. E. Amariglio, L. M. Berman, M. Boada, R. F. Buckley, G. Chetelat, B. Dubois, K. A. Ellis, K. A. Gifford, A. L. Jefferson, F. Jessen, M. J. Katz, R. B. Lipton, Tobias Luck, P. Maruff, M. M. Mielke, J. L. Molinuevo, F. Naeem, A. Perrotin, R. C. Petersen, L. Rami, B. Reisberg, D. M. Rentz, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller, S. L. Risacher, O. Rodriguez, P. S. Sachdev, A. J. Saykin, M. J. Slavin, B. E. Snitz, R. A. Sperling, C. Tandetnik, W. M. van der Flier, Marcus Wagner, S. Wolfsgruber, S. A. Sikkes

Date Published: 24th Sep 2015

Journal: J Alzheimers Dis

Human Diseases: cognitive disorder, dementia

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that dementia and cognitive impairment can increase mortality, but less is known about the association between subjectively perceived cognitive deficits (subjective cognitive decline, SCD) and mortality risk. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we analyzed mortality in non-demented individuals with SCD in a general population sample aged 75+ years. METHOD: Data were derived from the Leipzig Longitudinal Study of the Aged (LEILA75+). We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method to estimate survival times of individuals with and without SCD and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to assess the association between SCD and mortality risk, controlled for covariates. RESULTS: Out of 953 non-demented individuals at baseline, 117 (12.3% ) expressed SCD. Participants with SCD showed a significantly higher case-fatality rate per 1,000 person-years (114.8, 95% CI = 90.5-145.7 versus 71.7, 95% CI = 64.6-79.5) and a significantly shorter mean survival time than those without (5.4 versus 6.9 years, p < 0.001). The association between SCD and mortality remained significant in the Cox analysis; SCD increased mortality risk by about 50% (adjusted Hazard Ratio = 1.51) during the study period. Besides SCD, older age, male gender, diabetes mellitus, stroke, and lower global cognitive functioning were also significantly associated with increased mortality. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest an increased mortality risk in non-demented older individuals with SCD. Even though further studies are required to analyze potential underlying mechanisms, subjective reports on cognitive deficits may be taken seriously in clinical practice not only for an increased risk of developing dementia and AD but also for a broader range of possible adverse health outcomes.

Authors: Tobias Luck, Susanne Roehr, F. Jessen, A. Villringer, M. C. Angermeyer, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 24th Sep 2015

Journal: J Alzheimers Dis

Human Diseases: dementia

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVE: Dementia is known to increase mortality, but the relative loss of life years and contributing factors are not well established. Thus, we aimed to investigate mortality in incident dementia from disease onset. METHOD: Data were derived from the prospective longitudinal German AgeCoDe study. We used proportional hazards models to assess the impact of sociodemographic and health characteristics on mortality after dementia onset, Kaplan-Meier method for median survival times. RESULTS: Of 3214 subjects at risk, 523 (16.3%) developed incident dementia during a 9-year follow-up period. Median survival time after onset was 3.2 years (95% CI = 2.8-3.7) at a mean age of 85.0 (SD = 4.0) years (>/=2.6 life years lost compared with the general German population). Survival was shorter in older age, males other dementias than Alzheimer's, and in the absence of subjective memory complaints (SMC). CONCLUSION: Our findings emphasize that dementia substantially shortens life expectancy. Future studies should further investigate the potential impact of SMC on mortality in dementia.

Authors: Susanne Roehr, Tobias Luck, H. Bickel, C. Brettschneider, A. Ernst, A. Fuchs, K. Heser, H. H. Konig, F. Jessen, C. Lange, E. Mosch, M. Pentzek, S. Steinmann, S. Weyerer, J. Werle, B. Wiese, M. Scherer, W. Maier, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 9th Jun 2015

Journal: Acta Psychiatr Scand

Human Diseases: cognitive disorder, dementia

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to investigate how different mentally demanding work conditions during the professional life-i.e., enriched environments at work-might influence the rate of cognitive decline in old age. METHODS: Individuals (n = 1,054) of the Leipzig Longitudinal Study of the Aged, a representative population-based cohort study of individuals aged 75 years and older, underwent cognitive testing via the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in up to 6 measurement waves. Type and level of mentally demanding work conditions in the participants' former professional life were classified based on the O*NET job descriptor database. RESULTS: In multivariate mixed-model analyses (controlling for sociodemographic and health-related factors), a high level of mentally demanding work tasks stimulating verbal intelligence was significantly associated with a better cognitive functioning at baseline (on average 5 MMSE points higher) as well as a lower rate of cognitive decline (on average 2 MMSE points less) over the 8-year follow-up period compared with a low level. The rate of cognitive decline in old age was also significantly lower (on average 3 MMSE points less) in individuals who had a high level of mentally demanding work tasks stimulating executive functions than those who had a low level. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a professional life enriched with work tasks stimulating verbal intelligence and executive functions may help to sustain a good cognitive functioning in old age (75+ years). The findings thus emphasize that today's challenging work conditions may also promote positive health effects.

Authors: F. S. Then, Tobias Luck, M. Luppa, H. H. Konig, M. C. Angermeyer, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 26th May 2015

Journal: Neurology

Human Diseases: dementia

Abstract (Expand)

The spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases covers the dementias, parkinsonian syndromes, Huntington disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases. In these entities, brain MRI is often used in clinical routine to exclude other pathologies and to demonstrate specific atrophy patterns. [18F]FDG PET delivers early and sensitive readouts of neural tissue loss, and more specific PET tracers currently in use clinically target beta-amyloid plaques or dopaminergic deficiency. The recent integration of PET into MR technology offers a new chance to improve early and differential diagnosis of many neurodegenerative diseases. Initial evidence in the literature is available to support this notion. New emerging PET tracers, such as tracers that bind to tau or alpha-synuclein aggregates, as well as MR techniques, like diffusion-tensor imaging, resting-state functional MRI, and arterial spin labeling, have the potential to broaden the diagnostic capabilities of combined PET/MRI to image dementias, Parkinson disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases. The ultimate goal is to establish combined PET/MRI as a first-line imaging technique to provide, in a one-stop-shop fashion with improved patient comfort, all biomarker information required to increase diagnostic confidence toward specific diagnoses. The technical challenge of accurate PET data attenuation correction within PET/MRI systems needs yet to be solved. Apart from the projected clinical routine applications, future research would need to answer the questions of whether combined brain PET/MRI is able to improve basic research of neurodegenerative diseases and antineurodegeneration drug testing.

Authors: H. Barthel, M. L. Schroeter, K. T. Hoffmann, O. Sabri

Date Published: 6th Apr 2015

Journal: Semin Nucl Med

Human Diseases: dementia, neurodegenerative disease

Abstract (Expand)

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor of dementia. The effect of T2DM treatment quality on dementia risk, however, is unclear. 1,342 elderly individuals recruited via general practitioner registries (AgeCoDe cohort) were analyzed. This study analyzed the association between HbA1c level and the incidence of all-cause dementia (ACD) and of Alzheimer's disease dementia (referred to here as AD). HbA1c levels >/=6.5% were associated with 2.8-fold increased risk of incident ACD (p = 0.027) and for AD (p = 0.047). HbA1c levels >/=7% were associated with a five-fold increased risk of incident ACD (p = 0.001) and 4.7-fold increased risk of incident AD (p = 0.004). The T2DM diagnosis per se did not increase the risk of either ACD or AD. Higher levels of HbA1c are associated with increased risk of ACD and AD in an elderly population. T2DM diagnosis was not associated with increased risk if HbA1c levels were below 7%.

Authors: A. Ramirez, S. Wolfsgruber, C. Lange, H. Kaduszkiewicz, S. Weyerer, J. Werle, M. Pentzek, A. Fuchs, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller, Tobias Luck, E. Mosch, H. Bickel, B. Wiese, J. Prokein, H. H. Konig, C. Brettschneider, M. M. Breteler, W. Maier, F. Jessen, M. Scherer

Date Published: 20th Dec 2014

Journal: J Alzheimers Dis

Human Diseases: diabetes mellitus, dementia, Alzheimer's disease

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVES: This study investigates the impact of occupation-based motivational processes and social network variables on the incidence of dementia over 8 years. METHOD: Data were derived from the Leipzig Longitudinal Study of the Aged (LEILA75+), a population-based longitudinal study of individuals aged 75 years and older (n=1692 at baseline). Motivational processes were estimated based on the main occupation using the Occupational Information Network database. RESULTS: In a Cox proportional hazard model, motivational processes were not associated with the risk of dementia (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74-1.16). Individuals with a higher frequency of social contact at baseline had a significantly lower risk of dementia (HR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91-0.99), while proximity of social contacts was not linked to the risk of dementia (HR: 1.03, 95% CI: 0.98-1.08). In individuals with low indices of motivational processes, the frequency of social contacts was associated with a lower risk of dementia (HR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.88-1.00). On the other hand, proximity of social contacts was linked to a higher risk of dementia in individuals with high indices of motivational processes (HR: 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19). DISCUSSION: Results indicate that the frequency and proximity of social contacts have a differential impact on the risk of dementia according to lower or higher indices of motivational processes, while the impact of motivational processes on risk of dementia could not be confirmed. Future studies should carefully disentangle different aspects of social interactions and their association with motivational processes.

Authors: S. Fankhauser, S. Forstmeier, A. Maercker, M. Luppa, Tobias Luck, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 29th Nov 2014

Journal: J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol

Human Diseases: dementia

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aimed to analyze the association between new-incident-subjective memory complaints (SMC) and risk of subsequent dementia in a general population sample aged 75+ years. METHOD: Data were derived from follow-up (FUP) waves I-V of the population-based Leipzig Longitudinal Study of the Aged (LEILA75+). We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method to estimate dementia-free survival times of individuals with and without incident SMC and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to assess the association between incident SMC and risk of subsequent dementia, controlled for covariates. RESULTS: Of 443 non-demented individuals, 58 (13.1%) developed dementia during a subsequent 5.4-year follow-up period. Participants with incident SMC showed a significantly higher progression to dementia (18.5% vs. 10.0%; P=0.010) and a significantly shorter mean dementia-free survival time than those without (6.2 vs. 6.8 years; P=0.008). The association between incident SMC and risk of subsequent dementia remained significant in the multivariable Cox analysis (adjusted hazard ratio=1.8; P=0.028). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest higher progression to dementia and shorter dementia-free survival in older individuals with incident SMC. These findings support the notion that such subjective complaints should be taken seriously in clinical practice as possible early indicators of incipient dementia.

Authors: Tobias Luck, M. Luppa, H. Matschinger, F. Jessen, M. C. Angermeyer, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 10th Sep 2014

Journal: Acta Psychiatr Scand

Human Diseases: dementia

Abstract (Expand)

The high incidence of cognitive impairment in the ageing population, together with the challenges it imposes to health systems, raises the question of what affect working life has on cognitive abilities. The study, therefore, reviews recent work on the longitudinal impact of psychosocial work conditions on cognitive functioning and on dementia. Relevant articles were identified by a systematic literature search in PubMed and PsycINFO using a standardised search string and specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. We included articles reporting longitudinal effects that were investigated in cohort studies, case-control studies or randomised controlled trials in the working population. Two independent reviewers evaluated the studies in three subsequent phases: (i) title-abstract screening, (ii) full-text screening and (iii) checklist-based quality assessment.Methodical evaluation of the identified articles resulted in 17 studies of adequate quality. We found evidence for a protective effect of high job control and high work complexity with people and data on the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Moreover, cognitively demanding work conditions seem to be associated with a decreased risk of cognitive deterioration in old age.Psychosocial work conditions can have an impact on cognitive functioning and even on the risk of dementia. As the world of work is undergoing fundamental changes, such as accelerated technological advances and an ageing working population, optimising work conditions is essential in order to promote and maintain cognitive abilities into old age.

Authors: F. S. Then, Tobias Luck, M. Luppa, M. Thinschmidt, S. Deckert, K. Nieuwenhuijsen, A. Seidler, Steffi Gerlinde Riedel-Heller

Date Published: 22nd Nov 2013

Journal: Occup Environ Med

Human Diseases: dementia

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVES: Persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) experience health-related quality of life (HRQoL) problems greatly differing across Europe, and the European Union (EU) faces deep inequalities in MS management from country to country. Through the establishment of a European MS Register (EUReMS), an effective action is proposed to improve the overall knowledge on MS and support effective intervention programmes at EU and national political level. EUReMS aims to achieve consensus on its mission and vision, to define existing data providers, to develop models driving future MS health policies and research, to develop an information technology (IT) infrastructure for a data set, to develop a European shared governance and to secure providers' data provision into EUReMS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: EUReMS is meant to build on a minimum set of core data from existing national and regional population-based MS registries and from PwMS' perspectives. EUReMS' main partner is the European MS Platform (EMSP) acting in collaboration with associated and collaborating European partners. RESULTS: EUReMS was launched in July 2011. A Consensus Statement on purposes, vision, mission and strategies was produced in December 2011, and a comprehensive survey on existing MS data collections in Europe has been performed, and the EUReMS data mask is currently being discussed. CONCLUSIONS: EUReMS will represent a tool to provide up to date, comparable and sustainable MS data through an effective and credible register, which will encourage extensive knowledge building of MS, more equitable policies and higher standards in MS treatment and services.

Authors: M. Pugliatti, D. Eskic, T. Mikolcic, D. Pitschnau-Michel, K. M. Myhr, J. Sastre-Garriga, S. Otero, L. Wieczynska, C. Torje, E. Holloway, O. Rienhoff, T. Friede, K. Buckow, D. Ellenberger, J. Hillert, A. Glaser, P. Flachenecker, J. Fuge, T. Schyns-Liharska, E. Kasilingam, A. Moretti, C. Thalheim

Date Published: 3rd Jan 2013

Journal: Acta Neurol Scand Suppl

Human Diseases: dementia, Alzheimer's disease

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