LHA

The Leipzig Health Atlas (LHA) is an alliance of medical ontologists, medical systems biologists and clinical trials groups to design and implement a multi-functional and quality-assured atlas. It provides models, data and metadata on specific use cases from medical research fields in which our team has scientific and clinical expertise. Two basic characteristics are:

  1. an interoperable ontology-based semantic platform to share highly annotated data, novel ontologies, usable models and working software tools; 
  2. an advanced, application-oriented analytic pipeline for a clinical and scientific user community to provide disease-related phenotype classifications, omics based disease sub-classifications, risk predictions and simulation models for diseases and organ functions

How to use the Leipzig Health Atlas

Currently, we provide the following content and services:

Scientific projects

» List of scientific projects contained in the LHA.

Data sets

» Clinical data sets, OMICS data sets and SOM data sets for download.

Models

» Models such as algorithm-based prediction or simulation models.

Publications

» Paper resulting from our work.

Tools and services

» Cohort Section Tool (i2b2)
» Basic Analysis Tool (tranSMART)
» Metadata Browser (MDR)

Scientific projects within the LHA

» Project Area 1: Semantic Data Integration, Ontologies and mining services
» Project Area 2: Application Development and Validation
» Project Area 3: Application Integration and Community Construction
» Project Area 4: Management

Latest Publications

Normative values of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), derived from a large German sample.

Publication Date
PURPOSE: Daytime sleepiness is associated with several medical problems. The aim of this paper is to provide normative values for one of the most often used questionnaires measuring daytime sleepiness, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). METHODS: A large sample of 9711 people from the German general population took part in this study. In addition to the ESS, several other questionnaires were used, and sociodemographic and behavioral factors were recorded. RESULTS: Normative values for the ESS are given.

Obesity is Associated with White Matter Changes and Cognitions among Healthy Elderly

Publication Date
Midlife obesity has often been associated with accelerated cognitive decline during aging. Obesity leads to changes in multiple physiological factors that could impact neuronal tissue. Numerous studies have linked obesity and higher body mass index (BMI) with differences in cognitive functions and brain structure, including total brain volume, regional gray matter volume and white matter (WM) microstructure. However, regarding to WM, the available neuroimaging studies incorporated mainly small sample sizes that yielded less conclusive results.

Outcomes of stable and unstable patterns of subjective cognitive decline - results from the Leipzig Longitudinal Study of the Aged (LEILA75+).

Publication Date
BACKGROUND: Subjective cognitive decline (SCD), i.e., the self-perceived feeling of worsening cognitive function, may be the first notable syndrome of preclinical Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. However, not all individuals with SCD progress. Stability of SCD, i.e., repeated reports of SCD, could contribute to identify individuals at risk, as stable SCD may more likely reflect the continuous neurodegenerative process of Alzheimer's and other dementias.

No Association of Coronary Artery Disease with X-Chromosomal Variants in Comprehensive International Meta-Analysis.

Publication Date
In recent years, genome-wide association studies have identified 58 independent risk loci for coronary artery disease (CAD) on the autosome. However, due to the sex-specific data structure of the X chromosome, it has been excluded from most of these analyses. While females have 2 copies of chromosome X, males have only one. Also, one of the female X chromosomes may be inactivated. Therefore, special test statistics and quality control procedures are required. Thus, little is known about the role of X-chromosomal variants in CAD.

In-vivo Dynamics of the Human Hippocampus across the Menstrual Cycle.

Publication Date
Sex hormones fluctuate during the menstrual cycle. Evidence from animal studies suggests similar subtle fluctuations in hippocampal structure, predominantly linked to estrogen. Hippocampal abnormalities have been observed in several neuropsychiatric pathologies with prominent sexual dimorphism. Yet, the potential impact of subtle sex-hormonal fluctuations on human hippocampal structure in health is unclear.